Data Analysis

In-built sensors

WINGMATE provides six degrees of freedom data logging which is achieved with three accelerometers; Longitudinal, Lateral and Vertical and three gyros; Pitch, Roll and Yaw.

Take Off Analysis

To analyse take off data, we will focus on three significant areas within the datalog; 1. Taxi speed, 2. Take off run and, 3. Lift off.

1 Taxi speed
While taxiing to the runway, the plane is obviously still on the ground indicated by altitude (blue trace bottom graph) at airfield elevation. The speed trace (magenta trace, bottom graph) will show whether you are maintaining the “brisk walk” taxi speed or racing to the runway threshold.

2 Take off run
When you apply the engine power and the brakes are off, the take off run starts. The first indication of this is seen in the longitudinal acceleration (top graph, blue trace). The ground speed (bottom graph, magenta trace) will increase rapidly. The distance travelled between the start of the take off run and lift off is the ground roll.

3 Lift off
Now the altitude will start to increase and you have lifted off. The speed trace immediately after liftoff indicates the climb out speed. The climb performance is given by how quickly the altitude increases (blue trace, bottom graph).

Circuits Analysis

This view shows some straightforward practice circuits (touch and go)
1 Turning Crosswind
2 Turning Downwind
3 Turning Base
4 Turning Final

The heading during circuits is changing in 90 degree steps as the airplane goes through the different legs of a circuit. During initial climb out the heading will, of course, be the runway heading. Next, the turn to the crosswind leg is initiated and the heading will change to crosswind – in this case, 270 degrees. This can also be seen from the gyros. In this example we show the yaw sensor (green trace, middle graph). Downwind, Base and Final approach show similar changes in heading and yaw. This gives the heading trace the characteristic stepped appearance.

You will probably have noticed that the heading ‘jumps’ from 0 to 360 degrees. On the graph this might seem as a big jump but ‘in the real world’ it is a continuous change in direction.
The altitude (blue trace, bottom graph) will be between the airfield elevation at the touchdown and the circuit altitude at Downwind. Please note that the altitude is in meters.

Landing Analysis

Now let’s have a look at the landing data. We will focus on the data from final approach to touchdown and taxi away from the runway.

1 Approach speed
While on final approach you will be setting up the airplane for landing. While descending (altitude blue trace, bottom graph) you will be maintaining the appropriate approach speed (magenta trace, bottom graph).

2 Touchdown
As the airplane is coming down, the altitude decreases until you touch down on the ground, as seen by altitude (blue trace, bottom graph) at airport elevation. The speed at this point is the touchdown speed.

At the touchdown point the accelerometers indicate the impact of the landing. A hard landing is usually indicated by high readings on the accelerometers. In the case where the airplane was not lined up properly during a crosswind landing, the yaw gyro will show a high reading.

EFIS Data Analysis

This is a complete circuit that gives an overview of the EFIS sensor data as available on Wingmate Plus when connected to a Dynon EFIS.

1 At the take off you can see the nose pitched up (yellow trace, middle graph) which is maintained during the climb out.

2 The turns to the different legs of the circuit are shown by the roll gyro (green trace, middle graph) which tells you the aircraft’s banking angle during the turn.

3 The EFIS also produces indicated airspeed, so you can check your approach speed during the final leg.

4 At the landing the pitch gyro shows your flare just before touchdown.

In-built sensors

WINGMATE provides six degrees of freedom data logging which is achieved with three accelerometers; Longitudinal, Lateral and Vertical and three gyros; Pitch, Roll and Yaw.

 

Take Off Analysis

To analyse take off data, we will focus on three significant areas within the datalog; 1. Taxi speed, 2. Take off run and, 3. Lift off.

1 Taxi speed
While taxiing to the runway, the plane is obviously still on the ground indicated by altitude (blue trace bottom graph) at airfield elevation. The speed trace (magenta trace, bottom graph) will show whether you are maintaining the “brisk walk” taxi speed or racing to the runway threshold.

2 Take off run
When you apply the engine power and the brakes are off, the take off run starts. The first indication of this is seen in the longitudinal acceleration (top graph, blue trace). The ground speed (bottom graph, magenta trace) will increase rapidly. The distance travelled between the start of the take off run and lift off is the ground roll.

3 Lift off
Now the altitude will start to increase and you have lifted off. The speed trace immediately after liftoff indicates the climb out speed. The climb performance is given by how quickly the altitude increases (blue trace, bottom graph).

 

Circuits Analysis

This view shows some straightforward practice circuits (touch and go)
1 Turning Crosswind
2 Turning Downwind
3 Turning Base
4 Turning Final

The heading during circuits is changing in 90 degree steps as the airplane goes through the different legs of a circuit. During initial climb out the heading will, of course, be the runway heading. Next, the turn to the crosswind leg is initiated and the heading will change to crosswind – in this case, 270 degrees. This can also be seen from the gyros. In this example we show the yaw sensor (green trace, middle graph). Downwind, Base and Final approach show similar changes in heading and yaw. This gives the heading trace the characteristic stepped appearance.

You will probably have noticed that the heading ‘jumps’ from 0 to 360 degrees. On the graph this might seem as a big jump but ‘in the real world’ it is a continuous change in direction.

The altitude (blue trace, bottom graph) will be between the airfield elevation at the touchdown and the circuit altitude at Downwind. Please note that the altitude is in meters.

 

Landing Analysis

Now let’s have a look at the landing data. We will focus on the data from final approach to touchdown and taxi away from the runway.

1 Approach speed
While on final approach you will be setting up the airplane for landing. While descending (altitude blue trace, bottom graph) you will be maintaining the appropriate approach speed (magenta trace, bottom graph).

2 Touchdown
As the airplane is coming down, the altitude decreases until you touch down on the ground, as seen by altitude (blue trace, bottom graph) at airport elevation. The speed at this point is the touchdown speed.

At the touchdown point the accelerometers indicate the impact of the landing. A hard landing is usually indicated by high readings on the accelerometers. In the case where the airplane was not lined up properly during a crosswind landing, the yaw gyro will show a high reading.

 

EFIS Data Analysis

This is a complete circuit that gives an overview of the EFIS sensor data as available on Wingmate Plus when connected to a Dynon EFIS.

1 At the take off you can see the nose pitched up (yellow trace, middle graph) which is maintained during the climb out.

2 The turns to the different legs of the circuit are shown by the roll gyro (green trace, middle graph) which tells you the aircraft’s banking angle during the turn.

3 The EFIS also produces indicated airspeed, so you can check your approach speed during the final leg.

4 At the landing the pitch gyro shows your flare just before touchdown.

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